close

Current Members

Dr Emily Colgan (Trinity Methodist College, Auckland)

Claire Cunnington (University of Sheffield) Claire Cunnington is a Wellcome Trust funded PhD student in the Department of Sociological Studies, University of Sheffield. Her PhD title is “From Victim to Survivor: What actions do survivors take to redefine their identity when recovering from Child Sexual Abuse?” An aspect of this research is an examination of social construction of ‘child sexual abuse’ and how this has changed throughout history. The Bible has had a significant influence on child sexual abuse in terms of defining laws, influencing societal reaction as well as the specific treatment of victims and perpetrators. Her particular interest is how this cultural context affects recovery for current survivors of different genders and ages. Email: claire.cunnington@sheffield.ac.uk

Twitter: @Cunning_Claire

Dr Nechama Hadari (SIIBS) Nechama Hadari gained her PhD as a member of the Agunah Research Unit at the University of Manchester, where her thesis, The Kosher Get: A Halakhic Story of Divorce (Deborah Charles, 2012) explored Rabbinic understandings of autonomy and the human will, reaching far beyond the initial context of the research (the Mishnaic requirement that a man should only divorce his wife “willingly”). The thesis was subsequently awarded a prize by the International Council of Jewish Women. Her subsequent work has explored the intersection of gender, autonomy and religion in contexts as diverse as: attributing responsibility for war crimes, the coercive treatment of anorexia nervosa sufferers and societal attitudes towards teen pregnancy. Currently she’s involved in a feminist theological examination of the moral “fallout” from narratives we construct and accept about the Holocaust. In the context of the Shiloh project, she asks how the growing literature focussing on women’s complicity with, retrospective support for and (on occasion) active participation in the Holocaust might be interpreted in part as an uneasy response to growing awareness of the widespread rape of German women in the immediate aftermath of the War.

Dr Valerie Hobbs (University of Sheffield)  Valerie Hobbs is Senior Lecturer in Applied Linguistics in the School of English at the University of Sheffield. Her research has consistently focused on examining the ways in which seemingly inclusive large institutions establish community boundaries via language and, in some cases, marginalize and exclude vulnerable members. Hobbs’s areas of expertise and interest range from language teacher training and education, code-switching in the language classroom, disciplinary discourse (particularly philosophy and aviation), and discourse of, about, and for women in the Christian Church. A recent project involved investigating the discourse of divorce and of violence in conservative Christian sermons. As her work is interdisciplinary, she employs methodologies from a wide range of fields of inquiry, frequently using corpus linguistics. She is currently working on compiling several corpora of religious texts.

Twitter: @VHobbs5

Dr Alison L. Joseph (Swarthmore College) Alison Joseph is a visiting assistant professor of Religion at Swarthmore College and the assistant managing editor of the Posen Library. Her work explores the contextual factors – historical and anthropological – that contribute to the composition of the Hebrew Bible. Her current research is on the Dinah story in Genesis 34, dealing with the role of gender in the prohibitions against intermarriage and the women’s sexual consent (or lack thereof). It addresses how in this story, and others, theological agendas are promoted through sexual violence. Her first book Portrait of the Kings: The Davidic Prototype in Deuteronomistic Poetics received the 2016 Manfred Lautenschlaeger Award for Theological Promise. She earned her PhD from the University of California, Berkeley in Near Eastern Studies

Twitter: @AlisonJoseph20

Dr Jessica Keady (University of Helsinki) Jessica Keady is a Postdoctoral Researcher at the Centre of Excellence: Changes in Sacred Texts and Traditions at the Faculty of Theology, University of Helsinki. Jessica’s current research uses social-scientific methodologies, including Masculinities Studies and Positioning Theory, to re-examine and re-interpret the Dead Sea Scrolls. Previously, Jessica worked as Researcher in Biblical Studies and Gender at the University of Chester (2015-2017) and collaborated on the Sexuality and Anglican Identities Project with Dr Paul Middleton. Jessica recently published her first monograph, Vulnerability and Valour: A Gendered Analysis of Everyday Life in the Dead Sea Scrolls Communities (Bloomsbury/T&T Clarke, 2017) and is co-editing a volume, alongside Dr Todd Klutz and Dr Casey Strine, entitled Scripture as Social Discourse: Social-Scientific Perspectives on Early Jewish and Christian Writings (Bloomsbury/T&T Clarke, forthcoming). Jessica has recently written a chapter for Rape Culture, Gender Violence and Religion (a three-volume series for Palgrave Macmillan, edited by Caroline Blyth, Emily Colgan and Katie Edwards) on the relationship between rape culture and purity culture in the narrative of Dinah (Genesis 34).

Twitter: @JessicaMKeady

Dr Dawn Llewellyn (University of Chester) Dawn Llewellyn is Senior Lecturer in Christian Studies and Deputy Director of the Institute for Gender Studies at the University of Chester. Her work is grounded in qualitative approaches and examines gender and contemporary Christianity. In particular, she has examined women’s religious reading practices and literary cultures; the relationship between secular and religious feminisms; feminist generations; third and fourth wave feminisms; and feminist research methodologies.  Her current project investigates Christian women’s ‘choices’ toward motherhood and elective childlessness, and the ways this shapes their faith identities. She is also the author of Reading, Feminism and Spirituality: Breaking the Waves (Palgrave, 2015), and has co-edited Religion, Equalities and Inequalities (with Sonya Sharma, Routledge, 2016), and Reading Spiritualities (with Deborah Sawyer, Ashgate 2008). Email: d.llewellyn@chester.ac.uk

Twitter: @DawnLlewellyn

Emma Nagouse (University of Sheffield)  Emma Nagouse is a WRoCAH funded PhD student in the Sheffield Institute for Interdisciplinary Biblical Studies (SIIBS) researching the phenomenon of rape culture in the Bible and contemporary society. Emma’s research focusses around how biblical and contemporary intersectional gender presentation facilitates rape and disbelief culture through reaffirming oppressive stereotypes and informing perceptions of rape gradations. She is Assistant Editor of the University of Sheffield History Matters blog and co-organiser of the Sheffield Feminist Archive (SFA). SFA is a grassroots community archive housed at Sheffield Archives which encourages donations of artefacts relating to women’s liberation in Sheffield, as well as actively collecting oral histories relating to local feminism. Emma is currently writing a chapter for Rape Culture, Gender Violence and Religion (a three volume series for Palgrave Macmillan, edited by Caroline Blyth, Emily Colgan and Katie Edwards) on male rape in the Bible and pop culture.

Twitter: @EJNagouse

Professor Hugh Pyper (University of Sheffield) Hugh Pyper is Professor of Biblical Interpretation at the University of Sheffield. His research interests centre round the often unnoticed effects that biblical texts continue to have on contemporary so-called ‘secular’ culture. He has published on the interactions between biblical interpretation, translation and postmodernism, with Kierkegaard as a key figure. His involvement in the Shiloh project comes from his interest in the construction of masculinity in the Bible. The unexpected queerness of many biblical stories poses a question to its overt endorsement of the use of violence to maintain male privilege and identity.

Dr Katherine Southwood (University of Oxford) Katherine Southwood is Associate Professor of Old Testament and Official Fellow in Theology at St John’s College, University of Oxford. Katherine recently published Marriage by Capture in the Book of Judges (Cambridge University Press, 2017), which, using various examples of bride theft from around the world, analyses Judges 21 and concludes it is an example of marriage by capture. Katherine is also the author of Ethnicity and the Mixed Marriage Crisis in Ezra 9-10: An Anthropological Approach (Oxford University Press, 2012).

Dr Meredith Warren (University of Sheffield)  Meredith J C Warren is Director of the Embodied Religion research theme at the University of Sheffield, where she is Lecturer in Biblical and Religious Studies. Previously, Warren held a research position at the University of Ottawa (2013–2015), funded by the Fonds de recherche du Québec – Société et culture. Her most recent monograph, titled, My Flesh is Meat Indeed: A Nonsacramental Reading of John 6:51–58 (Fortress Press 2015), analysed the intersection of cannibalistic language, divine identity, and human sacrifice in the Gospel of John and the Hellenistic romance novels of the early centuries of the Common Era. She continues to investigate female protagonists in ancient Jewish, Christian, and Pagan fiction to explore the ways in which the narrative depiction of women’s bodies plays a role in reinforcing and challenging ancient social norms. Warren’s research centres on how the body is a focusing lens through which to understand ancient and contemporary notions of religious identity, belonging, and exclusion.

Twitter: @DrMJCWarren